What is Aloe Vera

What is Aloe Vera?

Denise Raynor

Denise Raynor

Aloe Angel

Follow New Horizon Achievers

www.newhorizon.doomby.com

Tel: 07860785008

What is Aloe Vera good for?

Aloe has been known about for a long time, it’s said that Cleopatra used it in her beauty routines and Alexander the Great used it on wounds at times of war. These days we know that it is great for skin, the immune system and it’s an ideal digestive aid. The purifying drinking gel also contains vitamin C which contributes to the normal function of the immune system and to a normal energy-yielding metabolism. As a topical product it soothes, protects and moisturises. In short, it helps support our bodies’ daily normal and optimal function both outside and in. 

Are Aloe Vera drinks good for you?

 You need to be sure of the quality of the product, always look for the International Aloe Science Council mark which assures purity and potency, and with that in mind 100ml of a certified Aloe Gel Drink can contain 70% of the recommended daily amount of Vitamin C for an adult which as already mentioned is great for supporting immune function, a topic we are all so aware of at the moment! The NHS website tells us that Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, has several important functions.

These include:

  • helping to protect cells and keeping them healthy
  • maintaining healthy skin, blood vessels, bones and cartilage
  • helping with wound healing

Which Aloe Vera gel is the best?

Always ensure you have an IASC product to be sure of quality.

You will find a choice of Natural, added fruit flavours and there is also one available with added nutrients to support joints and mobility, so really it depends on preference and needs. They all have the same core benefits mentioned above. The natural one, which can contain 99.7% pure Aloe with just 0.3% natural stabilisers gives you most of what you are buying it for, you can add your own juice to if required as the taste can be a little challenging to some. There are also some ready mixed fruit flavours available, Peach is popular for those with a more sweet tooth and Berry Nectar which contains Cranberry and Apple  offers another fruity flavour with high levels of vitamin C ensuring those benefits previously mentioned are fully available. I find that those who are looking to support their skin quality often choose this one. The version targeted at mobility, offers all the benefits of the other three with added glucosamine, chondroitin and MSM, natural sulphurs that help support joint function.

How does Aloe Vera work on the skin?

 Aloe soothes, moisturises and conditions so is useful for many applications on the skin, it is also a great carrier for added ingredients that can be taken deep into the skin where they can work their magic! Aloe with Propolis cream is a great example where we want to create a natural deep down soothing and protective barrier. This also works for other processes, so for example, a warming Heat Lotion where we want the warming ingredients to penetrate more deeply, the Aloe helps to carry the warming sensation deep into aching muscles and makes a great massage medium.

In short, using a good quality Aloe skin product we will see it absorb rather than create the greasy film seen with some skin products.

It’s also worth remembering that our skin extends to our insides too where Aloe can also help maintain healthy skin and tissue quality with both topical products and drinks.

How can Aloe Vera help your hair and scalp?

Aloe will naturally soothe and moisturise a dry scalp, just as it does with skin elsewhere  on the body. In an Aloe Shampoo instead of having to rely on man-made sudsing agents, aloe naturally supplies saponins, which helps create a gentle lather for a more natural clean. The moisturising qualities of Aloe help to produce glossy hair without the need for additives in a product.

Liquid Aloe can also be sprayed onto the hair and massaged into the scalp to assist in  nourishment and help protect the hair from the elements.

Thank you for reading this article

If you would like to know more or discuss what Aloe Vera can do for you the please find me here in the See No Bounds Hub.
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What is a professional celebrant?

What is a professional celebrant?

Lesle Coppen

Lesle Coppen

Professional Celebrant

Follow Celebrate with you

www.celebratewithyou.co.uk

Tel: 07585802501

What is a professional celebrant?

A Celebrant is someone who can help you to compose/conduct a ceremony. This can be for a “celebration of life” or funeral, a wedding ceremony, renewal of vows or a naming ceremony. A Celebrant has no restrictions in terms of format, style or content or indeed venue or location. A Celebrant can also help a loved one compose an “end of life ceremony”.

What is the difference between a celebrant and a registrar?

A Registrar works with and alongside a Council registry office to declare a birth, death, marriage or civil partnership. They also take wedding ceremonies at the Registry Office or in a building that is licensed to take a wedding ceremony. This ceremony is often not very long, generally has the same format and is legally binding. A Celebrant will compose and conduct any ceremony with any format and in any location. If a couple legally marry abroad they may want to then come home and have another ceremony for the wider family and friends that were unable to attend the original ceremony. The difference with a Celebrant conducting a wedding ceremony is that this would not be legally binding and to make it so in Wales and England the couple would still need to see a Registrar. Scottish rules are different.

What different services do celebrants offer?

A Celebrant can conduct a naming ceremony instead of a christening to welcome a baby/child into a family or perhaps a family have adopted a child and would like to recognise this with their family . A renewal of vows can be held to celebrate a wedding anniversary for any amount of years.

What does a celebrant do at a funeral?

) A Funeral Celebrant will help a family to celebrate the life and passing of a loved one. The ceremony can be non-religious, semi-religious and spiritual funeral services. This includes cremations, traditional burials and also green natural burials. This approach places greater emphasis on how the person lived their life, their personality traits and incorporates their wishes, songs, readings and poems from relatives and friends. I will also help a family with an internment of  ashes by reflecting on the original ceremony and saying a final farewell. Families in current circumstances may also wish to have a memorial service if they have not been able to include extended family and friends at the Funeral due to COVID restrictions.

I will contact and visit a family after being notified of a death and talk through in detail what they would like in the ceremony both practically in terms of requirements at the chapel e.g curtains etc and talking about their loved ones life, memories and stories. They will receive from me poem suggestions if needed and then a draft of the ceremony to ensure the content is correct. I liaise with the Funeral Director to order music, finalise the ceremony content and ensure the FD is completely aware of the running order. ( A bit like being a Project Manager, my old job 😊) After the ceremony I visit the family (normal circumstances) and supply the family with a bound keepsake copy(ies) of the ceremony. I’m then able to signpost them to any relevant support networks that they may need for bereavement support.

Where can a celebrant marry?

A Celebrant can marry couples anywhere they request from the standard hotels to country manors, forests, beach, private chapel, wooded glade, garden,  the list is endless

Find out more

Hello i am Lesle Coppen. Thank you so much for reading my article. Hopefully it has answered some questions you may have. To know more please get in touch. Here is my See No Bounds Listing link.
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What does wellbeing mean?

What does wellbeing mean?

Robyn Harris

Robyn Harris

Soul Alignment Mentor

Follow Equenergy: Wellbeing Naturally

www.equenergy.com

Tel: 07980669303

What does wellbeing mean?

I think that wellbeing is a very individual thing and that we will each have our own ideas about what this means for us.  Also, it’s not a static thing – it can alter as our circumstances change, as we grow and as we get older.

For me, it’s about much more than just an absence of disease!  I think that in the West, we often focus on symptoms, wanting to stop them when they occur and thinking that doing so will mean that we are well.  But I believe that our symptoms are important.  They offer us wisdom about what’s going on in our body, and where our beliefs are serving us – or where they’re not!  As such, it’s very helpful to give ourselves the time and space to listen and seek to understand what our body is trying to tell us.  When we rush to take painkillers or other medication, it often just masks the symptoms, meaning that we miss out on the messages they offer, and therefore on the opportunity to understand ourselves and our needs on a new level.  This might therefore result in us not meeting those needs which could lead to further issues down the line.

For me, wellbeing is about the ability to be radically honest with ourselves, and to take the time and space we need to explore any symptoms we might be experiencing – physically, emotionally or spiritually (by which I mean those deep soul searching questions that can keep us awake in the dark hours of the night) – and to address the issues we uncover, supporting ourselves as we learn and grow.

It’s the freedom to be our true Self, in all its wonder, and allowing our inner light to shine, while also celebrating the same for those around us.  It is balance, ease, flow, joy, even in the tough times, knowing that these are just growing pains and that they come to teach us and to enrich our lives.

Why is wellbeing so important?

For me the value of a supportive wellbeing practice is that it enables us to gain a deeper understanding of who we really are at the innermost core of our being, and to step more fully into this, offering us a greater sense of balance, ease, flow and joy.  It helps us to develop empathy, compassion and resilience, and gives us tools and techniques for handling the challenges that life brings.

Let me give you a couple of personal examples. 

When I was a teenager, I started having migraines.  The doctor prescribed some strong painkillers which I took daily.  This enabled me to continue going to school, but in not exploring what was behind the pain I was experiencing, I just pushed on and ended up reaching the point of burn-out, having to take over a term off school and resit the year.

I am now grateful for this experience, and the learning that it brought for me, as it led me to the work I do now.  I’m still a work in progress, but I now know that when my body nudges me, it’s much better if I give myself time to listen. 

The other day I was going about my usual routine of loading up the wheelbarrow to take food and hay up to the horses, when my back went into painful spasm.  I took a moment to connect in to my body, to relax and to listen.  I could tell that this was an important message for me to explore and seek to understand.

We’ve all had a tough year, with covid-19 and the challenges this has brought, pushing us all to be flexible to survive, in business and many other areas of our lives.  Also, the winter has been cold and the short days make caring for the horses hard work.  My back was telling me that I needed to more deeply appreciate, and address, the strains that this has been putting on me, to take time to listen, allow myself to rest, stop pushing, relax, trust, and do all I can to support myself and to ‘lighten my load’, which includes finding time for the things that light me up and ‘make my heart sing’.

For me, this is why wellbeing is important.  It’s about listening to our needs, and learning how to respond to them in supportive and uplifting ways, which in turn brings us deeper understanding and empathy for the needs of others, and a greater ability to support them in ways that help them, too, to grow.

Join my Wild Wisdom Wellbeing Facebook group

A safe and nurturing space to inspire you to greater wellbeing through connection with the natural world around you and your own unique nature within you.

Find me in the hub

You can find out more about me in the Hub or have a look at our feature page.

Be You Mind Body Soul Summit

I'm taking part in this amazing online summit on the weekend of 6-7 February exploring how to authentically and wonderfully Be You!
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